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with politics and public affairs, we casey jennings live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watched key public policy defense. every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs, get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should n
yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this letter. >> without objection so ordered. >> we now to the gentleman from tennessee. >> thank you for joining us today. i will take this in a different direction than we have forgotten so far as a practicing physician for 20 years, we are overlooking to some extent the source of the problem here and to my knowledge ag age is not something you can go down to gmc and get. it has to be prescribed by a physician. i know from my experience i have had a patients come and who were undersized and off of the growth charge and those discussions have occurred whether it is appropriate to use this hormone and generally that is referred to an endocrinologist. what is confusing to me is why is this so readily accessible and who are the doctors who are providing this for the wrong reasons and why is the punishment not starting their and maybe we don'
authorizing u.s. companies to the best of their pension funds, doing business with iran's energy sector. february of this year he offered a bipartisan resolution passed by unanimous vote of the senate for iran's right to freedom of assembly, speech and due process. day earlier iranians had taken to the street in peaceful demonstrations against the government or pressed by the siege of militia men. in times of peace and conflict he has traveled to the region to preserve the interests of our allies. in july he led a foundation to the middle east to discuss the ongoing threat posed by iran to review developments in the middle east peace process and traveled to saudi arabia, iraq, israel, lebanon, egypt, he met with u.s. troops in iraq and kuwait and iraq with vice president joe biden and general commander of u.s. troops, during the fighting in gaza. senator kc --casey has said we must prevent hamas, israel has the right to set up a naval blockade, key weapons to hamas and responsibility to protect its homeland. hamas is a terrorist organization that denies israel's right to exist and indis
the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press reports and conversations i had while i was in the region indicate that iran is taking or at least has the potential to take advantage of armenians regional isolation and thus the country's economic dependence on their common border to use armenian banks and enterprises to skirt international sanctions. the united states and our regional partners including armenia must be vigilant by fully comply current laws and regulations, and by a many sanctions is needed to close the loopholes. i hope that legislation is currently pending in the congress makes it way through rapidly and will do just that. regarding energy, sanctions are an essent
>> for state department officials resigned after reports for lack of security at the u.s. benghazi, libya. wittiest ambassador and three other americans were killed. at 8 a.m. eastern the senate foreign relations committee, we will have that on c-span2. later in the day, we will head over to the house side of the capitol. we have live coverage at 1 p.m. eastern here on c-span3. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every of them appear, probably will never happen again in history. it's interesting because after dad was sworn in we went in and took a picture, photo of the family behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexander virginia, suburbia, munich, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we been living there. dad was vice president. i've never forget that night mom was co
commissioner mcdowell and i were part of the u.s. delegation to dubai where we worked together to defend free and open internet. i would note that members of committee staff on a bipartisan basis were there as well and we are fighting for internet freedom and openness. the situation in dubai right now is food, people are -- we have a strong american delegation on the ground led by ambassador kramer and including representatives from across government and the private sector. the situation is fluid. the issues are important and i think we all understand that this will not be the last conference at which these important issues arise and fighting for internet freedom and openness is something we will all be working on together for quite some time. in the u.s. the broadband sector is strong and the u.s. has regained global leadership in mobile communications. we have more healthy subscribers than the rest of the world combined, and setting the pace globally on innovation and no software apps and devices. this means we face a particularly acute challenge to meet exploding mobile demand, the spectru
. that is not high speed the way it is calculated. average miles per hour. the minimum actually under u.s. -- of we have a standard -- 110. almost every high speed train in the world is running today at 130 some, 50 miles per hour average and we are in the dark ages as far as -- you will probably hear from ms. maloney and a few minutes, a segment from new york to boston is around 68 miles per hour average. pitiful. i started to talk about the horrible history highlights of amtrak's attempts to get into high speed rail. they did acquire train some years ago, the acquisition was a total disaster. there were extended expensive lawsuits that went on and on, they required a european design, and european fleet model that was allowed to tilt because you could get faster speed and curves and other things that could enhance the speed. unfortunately amtrak and the way it handled first the acquisition and then the redesign of the equipment, redesigned the vehicles so they were wider and they miscalculated because when the train got a higher speed and tilted the wider trains would hit. to compensate, they had
of representatives. three years later in 1962 was elected to the u.s. senate where he would serve for five decades, the second longest tenure in this chamber. i am honored to have served with senator inouye throughout my entire senate service. he and i often found ourselves on different sides when it came to issues always knew him to be a man of principle and decency and i never doubted his commitment to the people of his state, and doing what he believes is right. one of the few times we find ourselves on the same side came from the late senator ted stevens asking as both for help when his character was called into question. politically speaking participating in senator stevens's trial held no benefit for senator inouye. it would have been easy for senator inouye to deny his friend's request and blamed him for it. that was not house senator inouye operated. rather than letting a friend and for himself, senator inouye showed great loyalty and characteristic integrity in his willingness to testify to his friend's good character, put his own reputation on the line in service of a friend. i have a si
for a future supreme court justice, judge alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals on the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the united states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in celebration of the founding document, signed in philadelphia on september 17, 1787. tonight we are honored to welcome two distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of those of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thanks for the opportunity to collaborate with you this evening. the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence to nationhood. the constitution did not get as much attention. its declarations and it's for parchment pages to the declaration single sheets to cheer most casual readers. the lack of celebration however works to its advantage. over the years, the declaration was exposed to sunlight, dust and smoke but the constitution was never
. >> tell me a little bit more about your research on what the u.s. force presence and the cocoalition force presence might need to be after 2014 and what other, in addition to forces, what other resources do you think that the afghan state will require. >> um -- >> talk about your paper. >> for my paper. as a war college student, aye got to produce -- i've got to produce some sort of research product. they're actually going to hold me accountable for enjoying a year at stanford, california. so my penance is to do some research, and it could be a lot of key strategic issues. what i came to two months ago driving across country with two dogs, two kids, cars, u-haul, trying to find a place to live was, you know, i'm really passionate about the future of afghanistan and pakistan. it matters. so let me do some research on. that lots of issues involved with that. but specifically, what are some of the course of action, if you will, for force structure and mission sets in afghanistan after the combat mission with nato and isaf ends in 2014. and by strange coincidence, our secretary this morning, s
coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> a survey by the national institute on drug abuse shows that drinking and cigarette smoking was down among high school students in 2012 but marijuana use remains high. the director also noted that abuse of at roll was -- attar old was with also a concern. >> every year we do a survey of the future. >> indicators that are not changing and indicators that are showing there was a positive side. i'm going to side with those on the negative side because i think we need to pay attention to them in order to be able to prevent from continue to go up, and that relates to the marijuana use. over the past five years, we've seen significant increases in the use of marijuana among teenagers, high school students, eighth, tenth and twelfth graders, and, indeed, we have significantly high levels of daily use of marijuana. according to
. it was the most important thing public schools could do, prepare the u.s. for the cold war. so they both ended up in a russian class and that's what the met. >> host: how long do they know each other before they got married? >> guest: they knew each other for five months. they met in september. they got married in february. she got pregnant before that. so it was, everything about it was, you know, it was not a normal courtship, normal, let me put it that way than what what were battle and and stanley's reaction to stanley ann bringing home an african? >> guest: maslin told another biographer, i met before i started this book. david mindel who did the first obama books in madelyn described obama senior to him as very strange. they were not happy. you know, i don't want to say horrified, but it was difficult for them. it wasn't necessarily because of race. there were a lot of elements to. his personality, that he was so much older. their daughter was barely 17 when they met and when she got pregnant. she was an incredibly intelligent young woman. so this had a very difficult effect on her life. th
. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as, indeed, if it becomes necessary i will appeal to government back benches to afford a fair hearing to the shadow chancellor. that's how it should be. the chancellor. >> mr. speaker, britain is on the right track, and turning back now would be a disaster. we have much more to do. the deficit has fallen by a q
on in china today to what's going on in the u.s. but economies are much different, and certainly our systems of government are much different can. so it would probably be helpful for the overall conversation to set aside those comparisons. but i would like to kind of focus in on what's going on in california since the earlier panel was here. can you give can us an idea -- can you give us an idea of what the real timeline is that you expect it to be? when is this going to be up and running, and how much more money is it going to cost the taxpayers in northern wisconsin to subsidize california's high had high-speed rail? >> well, the investments across america amount to a little over $10 billion so far. that's federal so far. >> right. >> and obviously, states are putting in their own money. california's doing that. as i said, a high-speed rail in california over the next ten years. >> do you believe -- >> and cost is, currently, $69 billion -- even though you're a young man on your birthday here, you've been around a while. you've seen how this inflationary trend can go. do you have any guess
opinions. >> what do you see as the greatest challenge to the u.s. constitution in today's society? >> well, i think i did touch on it earlier. in terms of applying the constitution, i do think it's the technology. i mean, think about it. all the dna -- dna's an obvious example. you can be exonerated through dna evidence. far more often it's used to convict and cocatch. and to catch. is it a search and seizure to, you know, take a little tweezer full of your skin and see if it matches something else? very, very difficult questions of that sort. surveillance, we had a case, i think it was last year or the year before, with gps. the police wanted to follow where somebody they thought was a drug dealer was going. well, you know, you could use, you know, an unmarked car and all that. no, just slap a gps on it, they have at the end of the month complete itinerary. and it turned out the guy was going into a particular garage that was known for drug use. is that an illegal search and seizure? the new technology is amazing. new satellites, people can read the questions you're asking if they're outd
. please. >> from south totingham, sir we look up in disgunfight and disbelief at discrimination. the u.s. after the civil war, racism. britain in the 180000s, sexism. it wasn't until someone had the initiative to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet movement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage in order to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people are below their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate because we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart
to make a comment, ask a question. go ahead and push your name tag up. the executive director of the u.s.a. folk all. talk to us a little bit about what you say football is doing in this area. before that come address the general question. is football serving the best interests of children in communities and how can it be improved? >> it is certainly striving for parents and kids. we all recognize this challenge is. we are at a point where we are learning. first i should think dr. cantu for raising this important issues. i believe we are all in this together. we're all looking ways to create a better for players. i hope we are and that is to provide accurate and whenever possible evidence-based data for appearance. we have to be careful certainly not to scare parents. my interaction with parents across the country as they are looking for frankly someone to say we care about your kids. we were taking action. we recognize challenges and were doing something about it. so virtually there's two sides as best as i can tell. there's a sports site in the football side and of course the science s
in the u.s.. use -- an independent national anti-doping agency for olympic, paralympic and american sports in nine states. the mission is to protect and preserve the health of athletes, the integrity of competition and the well-being of sports through the elimination of doping. for senator lugar. i've often joked with him that he's been my secretary of state while i've served here in the united states senate because you could count on senator lugar to give good, unbiased advice on complicated foreign relations issues. and we will very much miss senator lugar's voice here in the united states senate and also his better half, char lugar, who i think we all know is a bright light. so, senator lugar, it has been an honor and a privilege to serve with you, and i know that your voice will continue to be heard on the important issues of the day. so thank you for your service to our country and to your state, and thank you for being a good friend to me. mr. president, we have this long tradition in the senate of senators giving farewell remarks. i want to alert colleagues that mine will be especia
he gives u.s. virginia bill of rights. that's model for the federal bill of rights. abolition of slavery occurred in several states. and we have to study, you know, and make amendments. what has gone before us. we have the duty to the future, i think we danger it best when we actually are understanding or respectful of the past. that's part of the national archives is about. if i could just, on a personal note, tell you the story why i'm here. and justice thomas' presence needs no explanation. he's justice thomas. what the heck am i doing here? well, when i was 11 years old, i came to the national archives, and i got this document that is big, big verse of the emancipation proclamation, and it was edition of the emancipation proclamation. you can take a look at the 100th anniversary of september 1962 and the archives released that a special edition for kids like me. and i got my picture of maybe lincoln. i'm a lincoln man too. [laughter] you don't throw anything out. [laughter] >> i don't. and i came here. that is what made me not cynical. coming at the very young age to a pla
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19